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Blog about Digital Asset Management


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Digital Asset Management book by Elizabeth Keathley now available

There is a new Digital Asset Management book coming out in late March 2014 written by Elizabeth Keathley.  Elizabeth decided to quit her full-time DAM job and commit herself to writing this book. Shortly afterward, I was asked to be the technical reviewer/editor on this book to review each chapter in draft form.

Working together remotely, we spent a good few months working on this book. The book titled Digital Asset Management: Content Architectures, Project Management, and Creating Order out of Media Chaos is now available for sale online. If you are still clinging to the last remaining bookstores, you may need to special order this book.

If you are interested in Digital Asset Management, check out this book for yourself:

Digital Asset Management: Content Architectures, Project Management, and Creating Order out of Media Chaos

If you read the book or eBook version, leave a review of what you think.


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Are you coming to the 2013 Createasphere Digital Asset Management Conference in New York City?

Createasphere is having their annual Digital Asset Management Conference in New York City on October 7 and 8, 2013. There are many new speakers presenting this year.

On October 6, 2013, there is a one-day pre-conference DAM 101 Workshop & Certification.

There is a series of Add-On Seminars:

  • How To Select a DAM System: Best Practices and Pitfalls To Avoid (10/7)
  • Semantics and DAM – You Don’t Know What It Means to Me! (10/7)
  • Metadata Deep Dive (10/8)
  • Jumpstarting Your DAM Implementation with PSV (10/8)

The Conference Program is filled with plenty to listen to, learn from and enrich your knowledge about Digital Asset Management.

Beneficial topics at this year’s conference include:

  • Identify It. Measure It. Monetize It. The Importance of Asset Identification
  • Digital Archives and Content Reuse
  • Brands and Story:  Essential DAM in Transmedia & Cross Platform Content Creation

And this year, I am back to talk about:

  • The People Aspect of DAM: WHO is going to do all this DAM work?

When it comes to the people, process, technology and information aspects of Digital Asset Management, you will hear plenty about the last three. What about those who will actually use the system daily or weekly? What about your users? What about those who will maintain the DAM and know your organization’s workflow inside and out? Does this take additional headcount? Can you simply assign/reassign existing staff to do this? Does this involve temporary or ongoing tasks? Do they really have the time to dedicate to DAM when it was not part of their original job description nor core competency? Do they have what it needed to get the job done? What are your options nowadays? Join us as we address the questions of WHO for your organization. We will address the people part of this equation among those new to DAM, the seasoned DAM practitioners attending for enrichment, DAM experts, HR professionals and technologists.

On October 7, 2013, Createasphere’s Digital Asset Management Conference will have a hosted evening cocktail reception with NYC Digital Asset Managers Meetup Group (RSVP required if you are not attending the conference due to space limitations).

On October 8, 2013, the 4th Annual DAMMY Awards Luncheon will be held to announce and recognize the DAMMY Award winners.

All this will be held at the Westin Grand Central located at:
212 East 42nd Street
New York, NY 10017

Are you coming to Createasphere’s Digital Asset Management Conference in New York City?


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What does a Digital Asset Manager need to know?

After reading one of my most popular blog posts, a few readers have asked “What does a Digital Asset Manager need to know?”
This is assuming an organization realizes why a Digital Asset Manager is needed who is skilled and experienced in the field.
That said, they will need to know how to work with the following:

People

  • Be helpful. You should there to help the people, the process, the technology and the information work together. No small feat in many cases nor a temporary effort.
  • Be resourceful.
  • Be honest. Brutally honest if needed. Do not hold back much. The truth may require revealing news people do not want to hear, but rather need to hear (if you have read my blog or know me well enough, you will know what I mean).
  • Be patient. Not everyone will be technical nor understand what is involved.
  • Listen. To your users. All of them. Not just to yourself talking and repeating yourself.
  • Be specific. Do not assume people know, even the obvious. Remember, not everyone is technical.
  • Explain issues and their solutions to the people who need to know about it in their perspective. Keep in mind who your audience isUse visuals to explain as needed. Document how to resolve issues often, then share this documentation openly and often. Repeat.
  • Simplify. Do not overcomplicate unless you like confusion, fixing errors and having delays.
  • Be an agent of change. Change, not because it is shiny/new/cool, but needed for increased effectiveness and efficiency across the organization.
  • Know who is responsible for what. If you are not in charge of something, who is? If no one is in charge, take charge. “Initiative isn’t given, you take it”…along with responsibility.
  • Speak up. Interject as needed. Do not ‘wait your turn’ or your points will be overlooked. Leave your emotions elsewhere. This is business.
  • Be accountable and hold others accountable for their actions (or lack thereof) when it comes to the DAM and everything else in your purview. It is a ‘two-way street’ whether we realize it or not. Top to bottom and back.
  • Be proactive as well as reactive as needed. You should not be ‘fire fighting’ issues all day, every day (otherwise, there is a prioritization and process issue).
  • How and when to say “No.” Contrary to some people’s belief, ‘yes men‘ can hurt the organization as well as themselves especially if a constant “yes” is believed to always be the right answer. It is not. Reality checks are necessary for all.
  • Do not kill yourself, physically nor mentally. Nor anyone else for that matter. Even if it starts to sound really tempting. Really.

Process

  • There is at least one process, right? And it is followed?
  • How do DAM users interact with the Digital Asset Management process and system?
  • Help establish a process, test the process in the real world, document the process in writing and train users on the process/workflow as needed (especially when lacking). Work one-on-one or with small groups. Why? Large groups and committees are like large ships…they are harder to steer in any direction and slower to start, stop or react in general. Don’t believe me? Try it. Find out yourself.
  • How does metadata entry occur from sources (owned internally and/or externally) to normalization of the data to entry into the DAM. Then, track the process all the way through to use within system to yield the requested search results.
  • Manage by assigning, measuring and prioritizing daily. Of what you ask?
    • Assets
    • Accuracy of metadata entries and usage
    • Error rates
    • Performance of systems and users
    • Tasks
    • Users
    • There is plenty more to assign, measure and prioritize…
  • Establish a process of user adoption from the beginning of the selection process of a DAM system to the integration of other systems to the regular operations of the solution. What are you doing to encourage your users?
  • How to make coffee (or tea) without spilling it nor burning yourself. (Like most things, carefully.)

Technology

  • Digital Asset Management solution within your organization
  • Metadata validation and when applicable, metadata automation
  • How to use and apply the LAMP solution stack (in case you thought there was nothing else to learn to improve your skills)

Information

  • Love information and data. Really. It may not love you back, but it is a give and take relationship. You get what you put into it, along with compounding value over time. Of course, I am talking about metadata. You should be one of the information experts within your organization.
  • Know what is available (and what is not), where it lives, how to get to it, how report on it, how to filter it and analyze it.Explain it. Train people on how to take ownership of it in their role, how to complete their part (metadata), the value of this information and why.
  • Know the difference between data, information and knowledge.
  • If you want a baseline to know how mature your DAM solution is now within your organization, start studying the DAM Maturity Model (DAM3), which was based on ECM3 as it continues to mature. Using DAM3, you can plot how mature your DAM solution is within organization today as well as where it could improve.

I write this as I leave my position where I was Digital Asset Manager for over 5 years. I have accepted another position as a Digital Asset Management professional in a different capacity to assist other organizations with DAM.

If you need vendor neutral assistance or advice on Digital Asset Management, let me know.